Posted tagged ‘flowers’

Getting Up Close and Personal

January 14, 2014

Sometimes I like to play with the macro lens on my camera and take close-up shots of my garden.

There’s no magic here.  I don’t use a tripod or anything.

I just bring the lens up close and point and click.   Technology does the rest.

Here’s a zinnia.

Close up IMG_4380a

A sunflower.

Close u FlowerIMG_3238

aPoppies.

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No idea what these are.  Close up IMG_4384a

I had to go out on the lake to get this lily pad.

Close UP IMG_3534

This was a hard photo to take.  It was  a real bitch trying to position the canoe with one hand on the the paddle, while trying to keep the camera inches away with the other.

The great thing about digital photos, is that with Photoshop you can zoom in and enlarge the picture even more.

Here are some forget-me-nots, which are only a few millimeters in diameter.

Close Up IMG_2249a Close UP IMG_2361a

Here are some individual lilac blossoms. IMG_2233 Close Up   Close up IMG_2292a

Dandelions are especially amazing.  They are now one of my favorite flowers. 

Close UP IMG_2389

If you zoom in, you see all kinds of curley-cues, which I never even knew existed until this year.

Close Up IMG_2267a

Flower IMG_2494

To give you an idea of how small these are, here’s an ant crawling through them.

Flower IMG_2488

You can see the individual grains of pollen on his back.

(Not bad for a hand-held camera).

I think this is a wild strawberry blossom.   I took this one in June near Wawa, Ontario.

Flower IMG_2504

Here are some pink wild flowers.  No idea what they are.

Pink Flowers Flowers IMG_2509

Zoomed up, it looks like some tiny yellow bears poking their head out of a cave.

Flower IMG_2500

Here’s a daisy from my back yard.

Close up Daisy IMG_3243

Zooming in shows a hexagonal matrix of pods (or whatever you call them) arranged in spiral patterns.

Close up Extrem IMG_3243

It’s all very mathematical.   Flowers like to follow Fibonacci sequence.

I once wrote a blog post about it here.

And of course, I had berries.

Raspberry IMG_3236

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Raspberry IMG_3234

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Close UP IMG_3062 - Copy

It was a good crop this year.  For a few weeks,  I’d get a bowl like this every 2 days.

berries blow IMG_3069

IMG_3072 Zoom

Once in a while, I also managed to get some insects.

If they’re occuppied with the flower,  I could get quite close without disturbing them.

Close UP IMG_4366

This bee could care less if I was there…she just wanted the pollen.

Close up IMG_4368a

Close UP IMG_4376

I found this fly in October while hiking in Algonquin Park.

The weather was cold, so he has kind of dopey and slow.    Which is probalby the reason I was able to bring the camera so close.

Close up IMG_5301

(Shudder!)  

Kind of creepy.

If my Grandma was alive and she saw this, she’d have a freaking heart attack.

Anyway, I’m just glad I’m hundreds of times larger than he is.

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Getting Mathematical on Weeds.

May 31, 2011

Dandelions amaze me.

We tend to take them for granted.

“Huh.  They’re just stupid weeds. ” , many of us might say.

But if you look closer, they’re actually quite beautiful.

And if you zoom in REALLY close, you’ll find something even more amazing.

Notice, there’s definitely a spiral pattern there.

If you connect the dots, you can definitely count 13 curves in the clockwise direction.

But if you connect the dots in a counter-clockwise direction, you get 21 curves.

Now, remember those numbers, (13 and 21), while I digress for a bit.

Consider this mathematical sequence of numbers.

0,  1,  1,  2,  3,  5,  8,  13,  21,  34,  55,  89….

For those of you who don’t recognize this,   these are Fibonacci numbers, where any given number is the sum of the previous two.

It’s quite simple:

0 + 1 = 1

1 + 1 = 2

1 + 2 = 3

2+ 3 = 5…and so on.

Now, if you draw a series of squares,  based on the Fibonacci sequence, and you get something like this:

And if you draw a continuous arc though each square,  it forms a spiral seashell pattern, like this:

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This is called the Fibonacci Spiral

Now, let’s take my 13 clockwise red-curves:

And if I take them, one by one, and superimpose them on the Fibonacci Spiral, I get this:

Kinda fits, doesn’t it?

Same thing if I take the 21 counterclockwise curves…

Again, each curve also seems to fit, when superimposed  on the counter-clockwise Fibonacci spiral:

Now, let’s just recap:

I zoomed in on a photo or a dandelion, connected dots and generated some rough curves.

And the shape of these curves fit a spiral based on the Fibonacci sequence.

Not to mention, the number of clockwise and counter-clockwise spirals are 13 and 21.
Which are Fibonacci numbers themselves.

What’s going on here?   Is this magic?   Or  a fluke?

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Actually, this is no accident.

You see, Nature tends to like Fibonacci numbers.   For example, you rarely see flowers with 4 or 6 petals.  But you see many with 3, 5 or 8.

Flowers seed pods are also arranged this way.  The number of spirals are always Fibonacci numbers…one clockwise, one counter-clockwise.

In this case, with my dandelion,  it was 13 and 21.  With larger flowers (like Sunflowers), you’ll find numbers 34 and 55.

But why Fibonacci numbers?

Basically, it has to do with Nature trying to optimize itself.  With flowers, if seeds are arranged in Fibonacci spirals, you can fit more of them onto the plant,  and you get more bang for your buck.    There’s a good interactive exercise that demonstrates this.

I won’t get into the whole mathematical explanation.   But you can find some good discussions here and here.

It’s not just dandelions.  You’ll also find Fibonacci sequences with pine cones, pineapples and asparagus and seashells.       Plant leaves are arranged in Fibonnacci spirals, to optimize the sunlight they recieve.

Fibonacci numbers are everywher in Nature   More examples are shown here.

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It’s pretty amazing, when you think about it.

Take an abstract concept.   A sequence of pure, unadulterated numbers:

0, 1,  1,  2,   3,  5,  8,  13,  21,  34….

And it’s architecture upon which much of Creation is built.

It’s staring at us, in our face.

The miracle of Pure Math, combined with Mother Nature.

Even with a lowly dandelion.

..and THAT’s why they amaze me.

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If these aren’t names of garden flowers, they should be…

May 24, 2008

 

 

 

– Dick Weed

– Chlamydia

– Fiery Crustaceans

– Wild Foonies

– Blue Simians

– Labia

– Fox Trot

– Emphysema

– Horn  Scrape

– Pink Chowder Heads

– Ornices